Fitness Gym – Dads Day Off http://dadsdayoff.net/ Wed, 15 Sep 2021 17:50:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://dadsdayoff.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/Dads-Day-Off-icon-150x150.jpg Fitness Gym – Dads Day Off http://dadsdayoff.net/ 32 32 Juri Commons gets an upgrade, but some find it falls flat https://dadsdayoff.net/juri-commons-gets-an-upgrade-but-some-find-it-falls-flat/ Wed, 15 Sep 2021 17:32:23 +0000 https://dadsdayoff.net/juri-commons-gets-an-upgrade-but-some-find-it-falls-flat/ Families, fitness enthusiasts and dreamy adults flocked to the reopening of the small park hidden in the southwest corner of the Mission on Monday. Kids ate popsicles and blew bubbles, and young and old who live near the old railway right-of-way inspected the new features of the mini-park, having done without the small but beloved […]]]>

Families, fitness enthusiasts and dreamy adults flocked to the reopening of the small park hidden in the southwest corner of the Mission on Monday.

Kids ate popsicles and blew bubbles, and young and old who live near the old railway right-of-way inspected the new features of the mini-park, having done without the small but beloved green space during the pandemic.

Juri Commons Park, which has been closed for a $ 1.9 million renovation for over a year, forms a narrow diagonal strip that begins near Juri Street and San Jose Ave., and ends near the streets 26th and Guerrero.

Its unusual orientation and shape comes from the fact that Juri Commons is where the San Jose Railroad once ran through the mission: if you zoom in on a map, you can follow the diagonal line to 22nd and 22nd streets. Harrison, orienting the buildings and forming a triangular green. spaces along its path.

The designers adopted the story of the trains from Juri Commons when they leveled the aging yard and replaced the cracked walkway: a large mural of a train that was on display before the renovation has been refurbished, and rails are built into the new smooth sidewalk and much more accessible.

“The path was cratered, the irrigation system had collapsed,” Dave Schweisguth, leader of the Juri Commoners neighborhood group, wrote to Mission Local in an email. “The center of the park gets flooded every winter (making the park completely impassable!).”

The new catwalk is really “very smooth,” said Ludo, 5, enthusiastically, slipping into his sneakers. Over a dozen other children happily ran around the playground.

But some adult park visitors have wondered what happened to the winding path that made a walk through the previous iteration of the small park a little more dynamic.


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Fitness center, plus ice cream and cafes moving into Water Street Tampa https://dadsdayoff.net/fitness-center-plus-ice-cream-and-cafes-moving-into-water-street-tampa/ Tue, 14 Sep 2021 04:04:49 +0000 https://dadsdayoff.net/fitness-center-plus-ice-cream-and-cafes-moving-into-water-street-tampa/ Water Street Tampa will soon welcome three new small businesses to retail spaces within the downtown Tampa waterfront development: Orangetheory Fitness, Shortwave Coffee and Chill Bros. Scoop Shop. With Phase 1 of Water Street Tampa due for completion later this year, developer Strategic Property Partners (SPP) says residents can expect around 70 retailers when completed, […]]]>

Water Street Tampa will soon welcome three new small businesses to retail spaces within the downtown Tampa waterfront development: Orangetheory Fitness, Shortwave Coffee and Chill Bros. Scoop Shop.

With Phase 1 of Water Street Tampa due for completion later this year, developer Strategic Property Partners (SPP) says residents can expect around 70 retailers when completed, as green spaces and plazas come to life.

“At SPP, we are proud to bring a variety of businesses to Water Street Tampa. [The newly signed leases] are just the beginning of this stuff, ”says Susan Martin, vice president of retail and location management at Strategic Property Partners. “It brings our neighbors, our residents, even the people who come to town for a convention, a place to train, a place to have a cup of coffee and a place to have a scoop of ice cream.”

With about a dozen new leases signed at Water Street Tampa this year, these three tenants, alongside existing tenants, say they see the value of establishing a footprint in this mixed-use urban development as it is still under construction.

Here are the three additions:

Fitness orange theory
Located in the retail space of the Cumberland Avenue parking garage

Known for its scientific approach to fitness, this international fitness studio is slated to open this fall. Adjacent to the neighborhood’s new Trophy office tower and the first WELL Core and Shell certified office building in nearly 30 years, Thousand & One, the fitness studio puts more emphasis on mental and physical well-being. . Combining science, coaching and technology to maximize results, this location will offer full body group workouts based on heart rate.

Short wave coffee
Located in one of Sparkman Wharf’s premium retail spaces

This award-winning Columbia, MO-based craft cafe will debut in Tampa in early 2022. Roast and Coffee offers breakfast, lunch, and baked goods, as well as espresso-based beverages and freshly brewed coffee and tea. . Shortwave roasts their own coffee beans and will provide a full espresso bar, coffee catering and the option of a pop-up coffee at various events.

Chill Bros. Scoop Shop
Located at the foot of Cora, a new apartment complex along Cumberland Avenue

Growing their business, the Chillura brothers, originally from Tampa, founders of Chill Bros. Scoop Shop, are opening their third store in Tampa on Water Street. Named after the brothers, their shop focuses on locally making all of their product, starting with the ice cream itself, through to cones and waffle toppings. Opening in early 2022, customers will have the chance to enjoy their all-natural custard scoops made from Florida milk and cream, egg yolks, pure cane sugar and a pinch of salt. Make sure to check out their traditional American style ice cream.


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Lewis and Ree Miller Pledge to Give Cornerstone of Giving; Name Memorial Stadium WestZone Club – Official website for Clemson Tigers athletics https://dadsdayoff.net/lewis-and-ree-miller-pledge-to-give-cornerstone-of-giving-name-memorial-stadium-westzone-club-official-website-for-clemson-tigers-athletics/ Sat, 11 Sep 2021 13:00:55 +0000 https://dadsdayoff.net/lewis-and-ree-miller-pledge-to-give-cornerstone-of-giving-name-memorial-stadium-westzone-club-official-website-for-clemson-tigers-athletics/ CLEMSON, SC – Lewis and Ree Miller of Spartanburg, SC have made a $ 2.5 million Cornerstone partner pledge to support IPTAY and Clemson University Athletics. The Millers are Cornerstone’s sixteenth founding partner in athletics since the initiative began in 2014. With an initial target of 10 partners when the program was implemented, the Cornerstone […]]]>

CLEMSON, SC – Lewis and Ree Miller of Spartanburg, SC have made a $ 2.5 million Cornerstone partner pledge to support IPTAY and Clemson University Athletics. The Millers are Cornerstone’s sixteenth founding partner in athletics since the initiative began in 2014. With an initial target of 10 partners when the program was implemented, the Cornerstone Partner Program has grown to 22 partners. In recognition of Miller’s visionary and transformational gift, the WestZone Club at Memorial Stadium was named in their honor.

“We are grateful to be a part of the Clemson family and are proud to be a founding member of Cornerstone Athletic Partners,” said Lewis Miller.

In addition to being Cornerstone Partners, Lewis and Ree have donated to IPTAY for 55 consecutive years. They have invested in the Lifetime Membership program and donate annually to the Heisman level ($ 12,000).

“Clemson Athletics and IPTAY continue to remain leaders in intercollegiate athletics due to the extreme generosity of people like Lewis and Ree Miller,” said IPTAY CEO Davis Babb. “We are very grateful for the commitment they have made to our student-athletes and our growing athletic program. Their donation will advance initiatives within our sports department by providing a world-class student-athlete experience for our young men and women who wear the Paw.

Lewis, a longtime Clemson Tiger, received his Bachelor of Science in Industrial Management from Clemson University in May 1971. While a student on campus, he was actively involved in intramural sports and its brotherhood, Kappa Sigma. Since then he has spent his entire career with the Southeastern Paper Group, where he started as a Warehouse Manager before moving on to CEO. Until its sale to NW Synergy (NWS) in December 2020, Southeastern Paper was a third generation, veteran-owned family business headquartered in Spartanburg, SC. and industrial packaging equipment and products.

“We are grateful to the Miller family and their unwavering support of Clemson athletics,” said athletics director Dan Radakovich. “Memorial Stadium is a special place on our campus. I am delighted that their family will forever be a part of the establishment with the name Lewis and Marie Miller Family WestZone Club. In addition, their donation will have a significant impact on our student-athletes for years to come, providing them with the resources to be champions in competition and in the classroom. “

Ree, a 1973 graduate of the University of Winthrop, is active in the community of Spartanburg, especially serving others in times of need. She and Lewis support the Hope Center for Children by dedicating their efforts to the organization’s mission of building stable and healthy families and providing children with a safe place from abuse and neglect. She also enjoys reading, being active in health and fitness, and attending the Tickled Pink Bible Study.

Lewis, like Ree, is dedicated to helping others. In addition to the Hope Center for Children, it supports Project Hope, which provides a lifetime of service to the autism community. He also sits on the Board of Directors of Mountainview Nursing Home.

“As a Clemson alumnus, I am very proud to wear the tiger paw and share the love of the Clemson family. We are honored to make this gift to Clemson to support our talented student-athletes and all that. Ree and I look forward to witnessing the continued success of the current and future Tigers in all phases of their college journey, ”said Lewis Miller.

The Millers reside in Spartanburg, South Carolina, and have four children: Benjy, Michelle, Andrew and Kimberly and six grandchildren: Ben, Rivers, Will, Elle, Graham and Wyatt.

With this gift, the Miller family became the sixteenth member of the Cornerstone Partner Program in Track and Field, joining those who pledged a minimum of $ 2.5 million to propel Clemson in the University’s quest to educate and prepare students- athletes who will compete and win at the highest levels.


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USF community reflects on 9/11 terrorist attacks and how tragedy shaped countless careers I USF News https://dadsdayoff.net/usf-community-reflects-on-9-11-terrorist-attacks-and-how-tragedy-shaped-countless-careers-i-usf-news/ Wed, 08 Sep 2021 15:33:16 +0000 https://dadsdayoff.net/usf-community-reflects-on-9-11-terrorist-attacks-and-how-tragedy-shaped-countless-careers-i-usf-news/ “When was the last time you spoke? What was the last thing they said to you? “How do you know they were inside the World Trade Center?” ” This line of questioning will forever be anchored in the mind of USF Assistant Professor Bonnie Silvestri. In the weeks following the September 11 terrorist attacks, she […]]]>

“When was the last time you spoke? What was the last thing they said to you? “How do you know they were inside the World Trade Center?” ”

This line of questioning will forever be anchored in the mind of USF Assistant Professor Bonnie Silvestri. In the weeks following the September 11 terrorist attacks, she worked for the death certificate program. As the then representative of the New York City Conflict of Interest Council, she was tasked with speaking to grieving families of loved ones who have been missing since that fateful day. Silvestri had to gather evidence and determine the likelihood that they were inside the World Trade Center when it collapsed or on one of the planes that crashed into the Twin Towers.

“Reading the affidavits burned my eyes. Each person had to recount the routine and the last contact of their loved one to demonstrate that the victim had indeed been in the building. They had to prove in court what they could probably hardly admit to themselves – their certainty that a person they loved could not have survived, ”Silvestri said. “A mother said her daughter’s last words, ‘Help me, Mom,’ before the line was cut. I get a chill every time I think of these words, and then I remember the torment this mother will experience with the rest of her life.

It was a professional experience no one could have imagined, but one that has helped shape the way Silvestri teaches his service learning and law classes on the USF Sarasota-Manatee campus.

“It was incredibly stressful going through what happened on September 11th, so being able to go to the Family Assistance Center and listen to other people’s stories and realize that I had skills I could offer to help them. or making them feel a little better has been a very good healing for me, ”said Silvestri. “Being able to offer my legal training to help in the aftermath of 9/11 helped me discover in a very visceral way that service to others is a very powerful thing. It has influenced the way I teach, especially the service learning courses. I talk about this in my classes to emphasize to students that serving others in the community can help them better understand social issues and design more effective ways to effect positive change.

Across the campus yard, 2,977 flags were placed this week in honor of each of the lives lost. Former US President George W. Bush was in a second grade class in Sarasota when he learned the country was under attack. Since then, the USF Sarasota-Manatee campus has hosted annual memorial services. For the 20th anniversary of September 11, a commemorative ceremony will be open to the public on Friday, September 10 at 8:15 a.m. with guest speaker Garrett Lindgren. As a former New York City firefighter, Lindgren arrived at the North Tower of the World Trade Center right after the collapse and worked at Ground Zero for months until he suffered end-to-end injuries. to his career by digging through the rubble.

Thousands of firefighters and EMS workers continue to experience respiratory problems caused by persistent exposure to dust and smoke during rescue operations at Ground Zero. USF Health pulmonologist Dr. Gaetane Michaud joined USF Health from New York University, where she had treated many patients with residual lung damage from the caustic dust and debris that covered much of New York. York after the fall of the two towers of the World Trade Center. Now in Tampa and a faculty member at USF Health, she’s starting to see similar patients as many from the New York City area have retired and moved to Florida.

“The true impact of September 11 on health may never have been known,” said Dr. Michaud. “One of the most important things survivors need to know is that the exposure could be due to their presence on September 11 as well as recurring exposure at Ground Zero for up to six months after September 11. And there were many, many young people who were exposed or those who moved from New York City who might be in trouble now and they don’t relate those conditions to their exposure.

The terrorist attacks inspired countless careers at USF. Elizabeth Dunn, an instructor at USF College of Public Health, was in her final year of high school in Texas when the tragedy unfolded. As a volunteer with the American Red Cross, she led the effort to raise over $ 60,000 at her school. She is currently an educational consultant for the American Red Cross Club at USF.

“It certainly influenced the direction I was taking in terms of my career. After working with the Red Cross, I realized how much I enjoyed mobilizing people and coming together, ”said Dunn. “It gave me the opportunity to work with others to take action and do what we can to help those affected by the World Trade Center attacks in New York from our small town in Texas. Then, in 2012, I was able to deploy to New York with the Red Cross in response to Hurricane Sandy. ”

Dunn now teaches Homeland Security and Emergency Management courses to include Exercise Design, which focuses on how to test plans and policies by creating an emergency response scenario, such as a shootout. mass or natural disaster event, allowing agencies to practice working together. in real situation. Students learn how to build a more resilient community by understanding what it takes to coordinate the response and recovery efforts necessary to protect our critical infrastructure sectors that are vital to national security, such as healthcare systems and public health, emergency services or energy and communication sectors.

Students worked alongside community partners from the Hillsborough County Office of Emergency Management, Florida Department of Health (FDOH), TECO Energy, American Red Cross, Tampa International Airport, and the Morsani Ambulatory Surgical Center on the USF campus in Tampa to develop and participate in various exercises. . They gain additional hands-on experience as evaluators during the annual large-scale FDOH exercise which includes over 40 agencies and over 500 actors who deploy to 16 Hillsborough County hospitals to test their responses to an incident. causing many victims.

The students also participated in various exercises involving people from the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, the Transportation Security Administration, the US Coast Guard, and MacDill Air Force Base, which is home to the United States Special Operations Command and US Central Command. – the military branch responsible for protecting American security interests, especially in the Middle East.

Many USF student veterans have joined the military to fight the war on terror. Wayne Taylor, deputy director of veterans services and coordinator of the Military Families and Veterans Success Center on the USF campus in St. Petersburg, made it his mission to ensure that veterans receive the support and health care they deserve. He joined the USF in 2020 after touring several times, notably in Afghanistan, throughout his 20-year career in the US military.

“I cannot speak for all veterans, only myself. On occasion, I have the chance to represent our veteran students and our military-related student body who are affected by military service, ”said Taylor. “Many are frustrated with our departure from Afghanistan, especially because many cannot understand the atrocities we have seen under the Taliban. Young girls will no longer have the opportunity to go to school, as they age, education and work are no longer options, but rather face a life of bondage. We remind our veteran students that any Afghan who could have come to the United States or any other country might not have had this opportunity without our presence. They made the difference.

Taylor recently initiated ongoing “safe spaces” meetings for veteran USF students who have served in Afghanistan to openly discuss their feelings about the troop withdrawal. Some students have relived the shock and anger of experiencing the Taliban’s misdeeds and fear their sacrifices of the past will make no difference in the Arab nation of today. The meetings are also open to Afghan students from all three campuses.

Also on the St. Petersburg campus, Arturo Jimenez-Bacardi is an assistant professor of international relations and political science. He said he was inspired by the post-9/11 wars and in particular by the “improved interrogation techniques” or the Bush administration’s torture program. His research focuses on the tension between security and human rights, examining how international law affected the use of torture by the US national security system during the war on terrorism.

“When stories about the US use of torture started to surface between 2004 and 2006, I wanted to understand why the US would put in place such a system and if and how the laws – international and national – affected American behavior, ”Jimenez-Bacardi said. “I was a student at the time, but these wars and counterterrorism operations motivated me to get a doctorate to try to understand why and how they were set up as they were and why and how they evolved. . ”

Jimenez-Bacard is currently working on a book, “Speaking Law to War”, in which he explores if, why and how states comply with their international obligations in times of great threat. He expects it to be released in 2023.


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Kevin O’Leary Helps Couple Fight For Their Gym https://dadsdayoff.net/kevin-oleary-helps-couple-fight-for-their-gym/ Wed, 01 Sep 2021 17:34:26 +0000 https://dadsdayoff.net/kevin-oleary-helps-couple-fight-for-their-gym/ Running a business with your partner can be frustrating, especially when you have very different views on their future. That’s the challenge of O’Shares ETF Chairman Kevin O’Leary in the latest episode of CNBC’s new series “Money Court”. In the episode, O’Leary sits down with an engaged couple to help chart the best course for […]]]>

Running a business with your partner can be frustrating, especially when you have very different views on their future.

That’s the challenge of O’Shares ETF Chairman Kevin O’Leary in the latest episode of CNBC’s new series “Money Court”. In the episode, O’Leary sits down with an engaged couple to help chart the best course for their boutique fitness studio.

Michelle Berry and Jason Brown run Elite Fitness, a small gym in Minnetonka, Minnesota, where both serve as personal trainers. Brown wants to invest $ 50,000 to find a new larger space for his business while Berry wants to stay put and avoid going into debt.

As the date of their wedding has not yet been chosen, the couple want to settle their business dispute before saying “yes”. And since they signed a contract agreeing to comply with O’Leary’s recommendation, his decision will be binding.

The case

In a good month, Berry and Brown each generate about $ 10,000 in income. They pay a total of $ 1,000 per month for rent and utilities for Elite Fitness.

Currently, clients pay individually for each personal training session. Brown wants to expand their 3,300 square foot location to a larger space, so the gymnasium can launch a more standard membership service. But Berry wants to stay small.

“It’s too risky to grow in today’s gym market right now,” she says. “There is no reason to have a larger facility and incur additional expenses.”

The couple still have $ 10,000 in debt since opening their current location five years ago, and Berry says she doesn’t want to add more debt to the pile. She also wants Brown to prioritize marriage over business.

“We have a wedding to plan,” she said. “Acquiring all this debt and opening a new gym goes even further.”

But Brown says the couple need to act quickly because Elite Fitness has a month-to-month lease and the building they are in has recently been acquired. He fears that if they don’t move proactively, they will end up getting kicked out on short notice.

“If we are put in this position, we will not make it,” he said.

The verdict


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Safe activities to do if you’re fully immunized, says Dr Wen https://dadsdayoff.net/safe-activities-to-do-if-youre-fully-immunized-says-dr-wen/ Sat, 28 Aug 2021 11:59:00 +0000 https://dadsdayoff.net/safe-activities-to-do-if-youre-fully-immunized-says-dr-wen/ There are a lot of people who are fully immunized and want to be responsible members of society. They wonder what they can and should continue to do? How about hanging out with friends, dining indoors and hitting the gym? Can vaccinated grandparents still be left with their unvaccinated grandchildren? To help answer these questions, […]]]>

There are a lot of people who are fully immunized and want to be responsible members of society. They wonder what they can and should continue to do? How about hanging out with friends, dining indoors and hitting the gym? Can vaccinated grandparents still be left with their unvaccinated grandchildren?

To help answer these questions, we spoke with CNN’s medical analyst, Dr. Leana Wen. Wen is an emergency physician and visiting professor of health policy and management at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health. She is also the author of a new book, “Lifelines: A Doctor’s Journey in the Fight for Public Health”.

CNN: How should people think differently about risk given the rise in infections and new research?

Dr Leana Wen: When it comes to treatment where we’re at now, I think people should keep two things in mind. First, most areas of the United States have substantial or high transmission of Covid-19, as defined by the CDC. We have to think of the vaccine as a very good raincoat. If it is raining outside – if the infection level is not very high – the vaccines will protect very well. But if it is a constant thunderstorm, there is a greater chance of getting wet. A vaccinated person is at greater risk when they are surrounded by many people who could be infected with Covid-19, and this is what is happening in the United States right now.

Second, we are entering a phase of the pandemic where almost all activities will carry some level of risk. People need to decide for themselves how comfortable they are with their household medical condition and the value of the activity to them.

If everyone in your household is fully immunized and healthy, you may be ready to take more risks. You might conclude that even if a breakthrough infection did occur, it would likely be mild, and you agree to take this risk in order to continue your pre-pandemic activities. Someone else may decide that because they live at home with young, unvaccinated children or immunocompromised family members, they want to be more careful.

I think both options are equally reasonable. The vast majority of the spread of Covid-19 is by unvaccinated people. Vaccinated persons do not pose a threat to public health and they should be able to exercise their own judgment on activities which are sufficiently safe for them.

CNN: Let’s review the risk of specific activities. What is the risk of eating inside?

Magnifying glass: Eating indoors in a restaurant is certainly more risky than eating out. What this risk is depends on several factors. To begin with, what is the configuration of the space in the restaurant? A busy and poorly ventilated setting will present a higher risk than a place where you might stray from other diners.

And you, who are you dining with? If everyone in your group is known to be fully vaccinated and these are the only people who will be around you, it is a safer scenario than if members of your own group are not vaccinated. I would also look at the rate of transmission of the virus in your community. The lower the rate, the more potentially secure it is.

CNN: How about going to the gym?

Magnifying glass: Again, it depends on the circumstances. If you are using elliptical or weight machines and no one is near you, then this is pretty safe. If you attend outdoor gym classes, the risk is also low. But if you go to, say, a high-intensity exercise class where a lot of people are breathing heavily, next to each other, and you don’t know if they’re vaccinated, the risk is considerably higher.

CNN: Would you travel?

Magnifying glass: The risk of air travel is quite low and can be further reduced if you wear a high quality mask like an N95 or KN95. The biggest concern is what happens once you get to your destination, as I touched on in this CNN Q&A.
How are the CDC's new mask guidelines changing the way families stay safe from Covid-19?  An expert's point of view

CNN: What about a private gathering of friends where everyone gets vaccinated? Would it be acceptable to continue with dinners and other indoor meetings?

Magnifying glass: It will certainly be a much lower risk than if the same people were together, but they were not vaccinated. A CDC study this week found that those who are not vaccinated are five times more likely to contract Covid-19 than those who are vaccinated (and a 29 times higher chance of being hospitalized or dying from coronavirus).

Many vaccinated people would feel comfortable with the level of risk in this situation. Again, it’s not zero, but it’s pretty low. This is especially true if other people at the gathering have a similar level of risk tolerance to you and are not otherwise participating in high-risk activities – for example, if they always wear masks in indoor public spaces. and if they avoid the higher risks. exhibits such as crowded bars and restaurants.

CNN: Last fall and winter, people formed pandemic groups. Would you recommend doing it again?

Magnifying glass: For some people, yes, I would. There are a lot of people who really want to minimize the risk of getting a breakthrough infection. This includes people who have underlying health conditions, where a breakthrough infection that is mild to someone else could lead them to the hospital. Others may be fairly healthy themselves, but don’t want to be asymptomatic carriers who could pass Covid-19 to vulnerable family members. People in similar situations, who have a similar approach to being cautious in their lives, might decide to form a pandemic group with each other. They might decide to only socialize others in the same pod indoors.

My family did this with another family who have young, unvaccinated children. This makes it easier to babysit, carpool and play. I would also advise others to consider the level of caution of other households before deciding to meet indoors with them. When in doubt, only meet outside.

5 ways to get your kids to wear masks

CNN: Can vaccinated grandparents still reunite with their unvaccinated grandchildren?

Magnifying glass: Yes. I would advise grandparents who are concerned about passing Covid-19 to their unvaccinated grandchildren to choose to reduce their own risk within three to five days of seeing their grandchildren. They could refrain from meeting indoors with others during this time and, if they want to be safer, I suggest they get tested right before they see their grandchildren.

My advice is the same the other way around, for grandchildren, if the grandparents are particularly vulnerable. Grandchildren can always make sure to wear masks indoors around others within three to five days before reuniting, and then getting tested before reunion.

If all of this is too much, consider seeing yourself outdoors only. The exterior remains much safer than the interior. And, of course, if there are people 12 years and older who are not yet vaccinated, they should do so as soon as possible, to protect them and others around them.


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Business support grant helps launch new fitness center https://dadsdayoff.net/business-support-grant-helps-launch-new-fitness-center/ Wed, 25 Aug 2021 02:50:43 +0000 https://dadsdayoff.net/business-support-grant-helps-launch-new-fitness-center/ Personal trainer Darren Lukaris has opened an impressive new fitness studio in downtown Ebbw Vale. And besides caring for his growing group of clients there, he’s paved the way for other personal trainers to run and grow their businesses alongside him. After four years traveling the world in the Royal Navy and developing his fitness, […]]]>

Personal trainer Darren Lukaris has opened an impressive new fitness studio in downtown Ebbw Vale.

And besides caring for his growing group of clients there, he’s paved the way for other personal trainers to run and grow their businesses alongside him.

After four years traveling the world in the Royal Navy and developing his fitness, he returned to Wales and started working at a large traditional gym in the area. However, he always believed that there was a demand for personal training in small groups to deal with special needs.

So, in the summer of 2020, the 25-year-old started offering personal outdoor training sessions safely in his backyard, while gyms were closed. He didn’t think that a year later he would realize his dream of having his own personal training studio.

“A lot of people don’t feel comfortable in a big gym with others exercising around them. This is why I wanted to offer a more tailor-made service to small groups and individuals. he said.

The company got off to a good start, despite the containment problems. “I couldn’t have asked for a better year, even with all of the Covid issues.

“I want to give other personal trainers an easier chance to be successful, as well as to provide professional and affordable service to the people of Blaenau Gwent and the wider region.”

The project received a business support grant of £ 1,000, jointly administered by Tata Steel UKSE subsidiary and Blaenau Gwent County City Council.

Darren Lukaris Personal Training Studio is well located on Market Street in the heart of the city, with good parking nearby and close to the bus station.

“The grant was very useful and allowed me to purchase equipment for the studio, such as a treadmill and weight training equipment” he said. “I am very grateful for the support I have received.”

He is now looking for Personal Trainers who want to rent a space in the studio and develop their activities in parallel with his. “They must have a Level 3 Personal Training Diploma and valid insurance. I offer flexible conditions – they will only have to pay to use the studio if they win themselves ”, he said.

Clients cover a wide range of ages and fitness levels. “Everyone can benefit from personal training” he said. “I help people of all ages set goals and achieve their goals, whether it’s getting in shape or losing weight. “

Going forward, Darren aims to offer nutritional planning and develop a gym alongside the personal training studio.

Glyn Thomas, UKSE Wales Director, said he was delighted to support this new venture.

“We are working with the Blaenau Gwent County City Council to help new businesses get started, and this is a perfect example. Darren clearly has a vision for how the studio will develop and is keen to help those who wish to do the same. We wish him every success. “

Councilor Dai Davies, Deputy Chief and Executive Member for Regeneration and Economic Development said:

“It’s not easy to start a business in normal times and Darren deserves great credit for getting off to such a good start given the challenges of the Covid pandemic.

“It’s always nice to see new local businesses getting started and growing here in Blaenau Gwent. I am sure this fitness business will grow stronger and I wish Darren and his team all the best for a prosperous future. “


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MMEA-US Navy Seacat exercise strengthens diplomatic ties https://dadsdayoff.net/mmea-us-navy-seacat-exercise-strengthens-diplomatic-ties/ Mon, 23 Aug 2021 08:57:00 +0000 https://dadsdayoff.net/mmea-us-navy-seacat-exercise-strengthens-diplomatic-ties/ IPOH (Bernama): The training exercise between Perak’s Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency (MMEA) and the US Navy strengthened diplomatic relations between the two nations and promoted the country in the context of the sovereignty of its waters in global level. Perak Maritime director Captain Shahrizan Raman said the exercise, under the Southeast Asia Training and Cooperation […]]]>

IPOH (Bernama): The training exercise between Perak’s Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency (MMEA) and the US Navy strengthened diplomatic relations between the two nations and promoted the country in the context of the sovereignty of its waters in global level.

Perak Maritime director Captain Shahrizan Raman said the exercise, under the Southeast Asia Training and Cooperation Platform (Seacat), took place from August 14 to 20. in the waters off Pulau Jarak.

He said the exercise had, among other things, increased the level of knowledge and effectiveness of officers and members of the Operations Center in managing communication tools and communications between countries.

He said that as part of the first phase of the exercise, a virtual seminar on “Maritime Safety” was held at the MMEA operations center in Putrajaya from August 10 to 13 while phase two was conducted. in the waters of Pulau Jarak August 14-20, with KM Nyalau representing MMEA in the exercise.

“During the training exercise at sea, communication training between the two sides involved the KM Nyalau, the US Navy USS Tulsa, the tanker Silver Hasa and the Information Fusion Center ( IFC).

“KM Nyalau also carried out a hybrid search mission using communication devices between the vessels of interest (VOI) to collect information and route it to friendly agencies,” he said in a statement on Monday August 23. .

Shahrizan said a series of other exercises were also carried out by KM Nyalau in conjunction with the US Navy, involving operations to combat illegal fishing activities as well as smuggling and human trafficking.

“The exercise was conducted at the agency’s operations center involved in the coordination of the Maritime Enforcement and Coordination Division (BPPM) and the Maritime Security and Law Enforcement Division (BKPM) from MMEA headquarters using internal communication devices such as the Government Integrated Radio Network (GIRN), phones and email, ”he said. – Bernama


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New Siksika First Nation boxing center aims to heal through exercise https://dadsdayoff.net/new-siksika-first-nation-boxing-center-aims-to-heal-through-exercise/ Sun, 22 Aug 2021 22:51:44 +0000 https://dadsdayoff.net/new-siksika-first-nation-boxing-center-aims-to-heal-through-exercise/ Breadcrumb Links New Local News “There is a lot of research on exercise and its impact on mental health and its positive impact,” said Dr Quintina Bearchief-Adolpho Author of the article: Meghan Potkins, Olivia Condon • Calgary Herald Tyler White, CEO of Siksika Health Services, left, Manny Yellowfly, therapeutic physical trainer, Dr Quintina Bearchief-Adolpho, clinical […]]]>

“There is a lot of research on exercise and its impact on mental health and its positive impact,” said Dr Quintina Bearchief-Adolpho

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The opening of a new boxing and fitness center on Siksika First Nation marks the beginning of a journey towards a long-term goal of healing, connecting bodies and minds, and promoting well- be physical.

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After years of pandemic planning and delays, the Nation celebrated the grand opening of the new Many Guns boxing and fitness center on Saturday afternoon.

Dr Quintina Bearchief-Adolpho, clinical mental health team leader for Siksika Health Services, said the facility will serve many purposes for the community, including physical activity to promote positive mental health.

“Due to the trauma, we have a lot of addictions in our community (and) we were trying to think of ways that would help our community in the long run,” she said. “There is a lot of research on exercise and its impact on mental health and its positive impact.”

Bearchief-Adolpho said boxing in particular offers participants an opportunity to “connect the mind and the heart”.

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“(It) would allow a person to be able to understand their emotions, to be able to express their emotions,” she said. “They are able to have cognitive flexibility, their executive functioning would increase, and they would be able to solve problems that they might have been facing for a long time.”

Dr. Quintina Bearchief-Adolpho, Clinical Manager of Mental Health at Siksika Health, speaks at the grand opening of The Many Guns Boxing and Fitness Center on the Siksika Nation on Saturday, August 21, 2021.
Dr. Quintina Bearchief-Adolpho, Clinical Manager of Mental Health at Siksika Health, speaks at the grand opening of The Many Guns Boxing and Fitness Center on the Siksika Nation on Saturday, August 21, 2021. Photo by Azin Ghaffari /Azin Ghaffari / Postmedia

In addition to coping with the isolation of COVID-19 over the past year and a half, community members are also grappling with recent findings of anonymous graves at former residential school sites across the country, as well as ‘to the ongoing intergenerational trauma caused by this school system.

“We hope that people can use the gym as an outlet to provide a healthier type of intervention, compared to self-medication,” she said. “We hope this will help individuals overcome some of their challenges that they face with issues related to COVID and all that surrounds (residential schools) issues.”

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One of the centre’s therapeutic physical trainers, Manny Yellow Fly, said the gym’s namesake, the late Clifford Many Guns, will serve as an inspiration to staff and clients.

“Although Clifford was a guy who influenced and promoted boxing, he was also a guy who played just about every sport, coached a lot of sports and brought a lot of good values ​​to the community,” he said. he said, adding that he hopes to use The Mindset of Many Guns in particular to have a positive effect on the youth of the Nation.

“I can integrate the boxing mentality, the values ​​and characteristics that come with boxing, like perseverance, (positive) attitudes, hard work. . . and sort of mix them together.

Therapeutic fitness trainer Manny Yellow Fly poses for a photo at The Many Guns Boxing and Fitness Center in Siksika Nation on Saturday, August 21, 2021.
Therapeutic fitness trainer Manny Yellow Fly poses for a photo at The Many Guns Boxing and Fitness Center in Siksika Nation on Saturday, August 21, 2021. Photo by Azin Ghaffari /Azin Ghaffari / Postmedia

In addition to camps and other programs specifically for youth, Yellow Fly said there will also be opportunities for seniors to participate in various activities. Yoga, CrossFit and other fitness classes will be incorporated into the center in the future.

With the official opening of the center, Bearchief-Adolpho said the opportunities for healing and for community members to better manage their health, both mental and physical, are plentiful.

“If we can heal the physical self, we can find out the underlying issues, the mental health issues that are occurring. . . I have a lot of hope that this can have a positive impact in our community.

ocondon@postmedia.com

mpotkins@postmedia.com


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Lead Navy Large-Scale Exercise 2021 from a tent in Little Creek https://dadsdayoff.net/lead-navy-large-scale-exercise-2021-from-a-tent-in-little-creek/ Sun, 22 Aug 2021 14:57:57 +0000 https://dadsdayoff.net/lead-navy-large-scale-exercise-2021-from-a-tent-in-little-creek/ Vice admiral. Andrew Lewis, commander of the U.S. 2nd Fleet, speaks with a group of Sailors as he intends to present a challenge during a visit to the US 2nd Fleet’s Expeditionary Maritime Operations Center (ExMOC ) Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story on Aug. 11, in support of Large Scale Exercise (LSE) 2021. (Jahlena […]]]>

Vice admiral. Andrew Lewis, commander of the U.S. 2nd Fleet, speaks with a group of Sailors as he intends to present a challenge during a visit to the US 2nd Fleet’s Expeditionary Maritime Operations Center (ExMOC ) Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story on Aug. 11, in support of Large Scale Exercise (LSE) 2021. (Jahlena Royer / US Navy)

VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (Tribune News Service) – Planners and operations personnel of the U.S. 2nd Fleet typically lead East Coast ships and units from the second floor of their headquarters. But a just completed Navy exercise around the world brought a team of more than 50 people to a tent in Little Creek to train in war conditions.

“You never really know what you can do until match day,” said Vice Admiral Andrew Lewis, Commander of the 2nd Fleet and one of the five fleet commanders participating in the full-scale exercise. 2021, the first global exercise of its kind since the height of the Cold War.

Operating in an ad hoc maritime operations center – like the 760 square foot tent at Little Creek, where torrential rains bubbled mud through the floor – is a specialty of the 2nd Fleet. It was the seventh such operations center managed by the fleet since its reconstitution by the Navy in 2018.

More recently, this meant that the Vice Fleet Commander, Canadian Rear Admiral Steve Waddell, along with Norfolk personnel – including a French naval officer on temporary assignment – headed the maritime operations center in Europe.

The 2nd Fleet Group set up its temporary store on an unknown US Navy warship based in Italy and directed operations off the coast of Portugal.

There is a strong international flavor to the 2nd Fleet, as its commander is also in charge of the new NATO Joint Forces Command in Norfolk, which is responsible for operations in the North Atlantic “from Florida to Finnmark (north from Norway) and from the seabed to space, ”as Lewis likes to say.

“It was as if two start-ups were fully operational in just a few short years,” said Lewis, who took charge of the relaunch of the 2nd Fleet, while also taking on the task of leading NATO’s new command. .

The management of the operations center of this year’s NATO exercise was an intensive exercise on the management of ships, sailors, Marines and Airmen from 10 countries, including the world’s largest deployment of Fleet Air helicopters Arm in a decade.

“I can’t stress how important the alliance is,” Lewis said. “The difference with the United States is that we have friends and we keep friends.”

Working in the tent at Little Creek, Fleet personnel, Sailors and Marines simulated the rapid transfers of responsibility and reporting channels that arise when it comes to dealing with a global threat.

“It’s all about transparency… you have to know who is on the other end of the line,” Lewis said.

The large-scale exercise provided an opportunity for the 2nd Fleet and the Little Creek-based Navy Expeditionary Combat Command not only to practice setting up an ad hoc operations center, he said. stated, but it also allowed fleet personnel to work with reservists.

“This formation takes the Marines and Sailors out of garrison mode and puts us in a war scenario,” said Colonel Robert Clark of the US Marine Corps, the staff officer of the 2nd Fleet who was in charge of the Little Creek operations center.

Lewis’s role in the exercise included “multiple points of contact each day” with the naval air task forces based on the East Coast and the amphibious ships participating in the exercise.

Some were at sea. USS Kearsarge drilled on new concepts on combined Navy and Marine Corps operations. The destroyers USS Cole and Gravely conducted anti-submarine missions.

Some worked virtually, like the sailors of the USS San Jacinto, on a pier at Naval Base Norfolk. Their mission was the same as if they were at sea, providing air and missile defense for the strike force of the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman. And while they were physically in Norfolk, they were operating, virtually, off the coast of Norway.

A key task for Lewis was to coordinate operations with his counterparts from four other fleets, spread across 17 time zones. This part, as well as the operations center and communications throughout the chain of command, went well, he said.

But it took a lot of work.

With over 25,000 Sailors and Marines on 36 ships at sea and over 50 other participants docked, “it was a 24/7 exercise,” Lewis said.

© 2021 Daily Press.

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